• Is Your Newspaper Advertising Delivering? Here’s Seven Ways to Tell.

    On: August 17, 2016
    In: Branding, Marketing, News, Newspapers
    Views: 1715
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    1. Dominate The Page. A good ad, like people how moved to Arizona, needs its space. In a medium where you, the news and your competitors are all struggling for the same reader, it’s important to “win the spread.”
    2. Corral The Reader. The right border around a small add can give it a big impact. It’s an inexpensive way to fence off your territory and let people know what’s yours.
    3. The Ol’ One-Two. A strong headline and graphic working together can be as appealing as peanut butter and jelly, bacon and eggs, or spaghetti and meatballs. If it’s really spectacular…ice cream and apple pie.
    4. The “Me” Generation. The old Mousketeers asked “Why? Because we like you,” are now asking, “What’s in it for me?” A benefit in the headline will keep them all ears.
    5. Keep It Simple. “See Jack run” and “to be or not to be” are both classics. They are easy to understand. And hard to forget. Whether you’re writing to someone who’s 5 or 50, simple sentences often work best.
    6. White Space. Philip Glass, a famous composer, said it was as much a part if his music as the melody. White space doesn’t have to be filled up with ink. Let it work to your advantage.
    7. Color Gives You Pop! In the black and white world of newspaper, color can really set you apart from the crowd. The pink hair you see people with at the mall will verify that.

     

    If your newspaper ads aren’t creating any sales news, shouldn’t we talk?

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  • Print-Ready Files for Happy Designers (Part 2)

    On: May 16, 2013
    In: Design
    Views: 1064
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    Last week I enlightened you with 5 helpful tips for successful print-ready files. As promised, I’ve returned with Part 2 of this topic, so without further ado, here are 5 more tips for preparing your print-ready files.

    6. SIZE MATTERS! (Print Size, That Is)
    Be sure to always create your files at the actual size you want them printed. Also, make sure you have the appropriate resolution, for most print jobs (e.g. brochures, business cards and flyers) 300dpi is acceptable. If you fail to build your files at actual size, you will most definitely run into issues during printing. Just think about it, it wouldn’t make sense to create a poster at business card size and expect it to print out perfectly crisp when the printer enlarges it to poster size, right? *Please note that large scale printing (e.g. bus benches and billboards) follow different rules for file size… but that’s a topic for another day!

    7. STICK WITH CMYK
    This is a design basic! RGB is used for on-screen, such as websites and eblasts. CMYK is used for print, such as posters and flyers, just to name a few. That being said, always convert your files to CMYK before printing – even if you can’t see any change on screen, it can make a world of difference when printed.

    8. GET A PROOF
    For multi-page documents, such as programs or books, it’s helpful to provide your printer with a proof. That way they can ensure that all pages are in the correct position and things are aligned the way you want them. In addition to giving your printer a proof, also request a color proof from your printer. This will allow you to fix any color issues before they run the whole job and you’re stuck with something that isn’t right.

    9. BLEED
    No, I’m not talking about actual blood, I’m talking about the bleeds on your document. Be sure to ALWAYS include bleeds on your document… I have found that a 1/8” (or .125”) bleed works fine.

    10. GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER
    I have found that the key to successful printing projects is to get to know your printer. Most printers are more than willing to work with you to get your projects printed to your satifaction. Don’t be afraid to ask question, tour the print facility or voice your opinion when your project just isn’t printing right. If your printer doesn’t seem to be offering you any help, don’t be afraid to try a new printer!

    Hopefully some or all of these tips will help you create successful print-ready files. Good luck and happy printing!
    Kristen Oaxaca, Graphic Designer

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  • Print-Ready Files for Happy Designers (Part 1)

    On: May 9, 2013
    In: Design
    Views: 1128
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    You know that feeling you get when you finally finish a project and send it off to the printer? It’s a pretty great feeling, right? How about that feeling you get when the printer calls you saying there’s something wrong with your file or when your project has been delivered and the client calls you ranting that there’s a typo in your design?!
    I know, I know… that totally killed your happy feeling!

    Well, here are a few tips to get you on the right track to print-ready files and successful outcomes!

    1. TIMING IS EVERYTHING
    Contact your printer ahead of time and figure out how long they will need to print your project. Count back from your due date and create deadlines for yourself… remember
    to add a bit of cushion just in case something goes wrong.

    2. FONT FAILURE
    Unless you design every piece with Times New Roman or Arial, you can’t expect your printer to have every font that you’ve used in your design. To avoid font defaulting once your file gets to the printer, remember to embed your fonts into your file.

    3. CHECK IT… AGAIN!
    Nothing is more important than proofing your documents… I mean you wouldn’t want
    to have your client’s name or website misspelled, right? Even if you’ve proofed your document 100 times, I recommend having someone else proof it (even if they aren’t
    a designer) — sometimes a fresh pair of eyes can make all the difference!

    4. IMAGE QUALITY
    Be sure to double check your image proportions, dimensions and resolution. Please don’t be one of those designers that stretches an image out of proportion so it looks super squished or super stretched! en if the actual size of your image is correct, the resolution may be too low – creating ugly pixelated images in what could have been
    a beautifully designed piece.

    5. ATTENTION TO DETAIL
    It may just be because I have obsessive compulsive tendencies, but I find this tip
    to be extremely important! Paying attention to the small details and keeping things consistent is key to a great design. Make sure that margins are consistent on
    multi-page documents, punctuation is the same throughout, spelling is consistent
    (for example, in my job I have to fix many inconsistencies between BolchalkFReY, BolchalkFrey and Bolchalk Frey… it may not seem super important, but it is), etc.

    Hopefully these few tips will help you get started on creating great print-ready files,
    but stay tuned next week for more tips for successful files that make happy designers!

    Kristen Oaxaca, Graphic Designer

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