• Myth #2: It Should Only Take A Couple Of Hours To Design A Logo Or A Website

    On: August 24, 2016
    In: Branding, Design, News
    Views: 877
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    It’s easy to look at a logo or a brochure layout that appears to be very simple and conclude that did not take much time to design. That conclusion is very far from reality. Graphic designers follow a methodical design process, and every step of that process requires time to complete.

    Designers need to research, ask questions, formulate a creative brief that guides them to developing a solid final design. After the brief is established, a bulk of our time goes into creating ideas and concepts. Depending on the number of rounds of revisions, the refinement phase may require additional time. Stronger concepts are refined until the final design is approved. The design process applies to everything from logos to web sites and requires several weeks to several months depending on the scope of the project.

    Other aspects of design can be time-intensive. A layout of a document like a brochure, a newsletter or a magazine spread is more than copying and pasting text from a Word document. There needs to be time allowed for typesetting to optimize readability, for formatting to create consistent appearance, and for proofreading so that the message isn’t compromised by errors.

    Achieving an effective design solution cannot be rushed. Hastening projects along also leaves room for errors to occur which is a waste of time and money for the client and the designer. Remember, the wise words of Benjamin Franklin, “Take time for all things: great haste makes great waste.”

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  • Is Your Newspaper Advertising Delivering? Here’s Seven Ways to Tell.

    On: August 17, 2016
    In: Branding, Marketing, News, Newspapers
    Views: 1387
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    1. Dominate The Page. A good ad, like people how moved to Arizona, needs its space. In a medium where you, the news and your competitors are all struggling for the same reader, it’s important to “win the spread.”
    2. Corral The Reader. The right border around a small add can give it a big impact. It’s an inexpensive way to fence off your territory and let people know what’s yours.
    3. The Ol’ One-Two. A strong headline and graphic working together can be as appealing as peanut butter and jelly, bacon and eggs, or spaghetti and meatballs. If it’s really spectacular…ice cream and apple pie.
    4. The “Me” Generation. The old Mousketeers asked “Why? Because we like you,” are now asking, “What’s in it for me?” A benefit in the headline will keep them all ears.
    5. Keep It Simple. “See Jack run” and “to be or not to be” are both classics. They are easy to understand. And hard to forget. Whether you’re writing to someone who’s 5 or 50, simple sentences often work best.
    6. White Space. Philip Glass, a famous composer, said it was as much a part if his music as the melody. White space doesn’t have to be filled up with ink. Let it work to your advantage.
    7. Color Gives You Pop! In the black and white world of newspaper, color can really set you apart from the crowd. The pink hair you see people with at the mall will verify that.

     

    If your newspaper ads aren’t creating any sales news, shouldn’t we talk?

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  • Debunking the Graphic Design Myths

    On: July 20, 2016
    In: Art, Design, News
    Views: 939
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    Myth #1: Graphic Design Is Completely Done On Computers
    It is true that today’s designers perform their work on computers; however, even the most seasoned designers begin the process with pencil and paper. Many clients don’t realize this because sketches aren’t usually what is presented in the online portfolios. The final outcome tends to be what is seen or featured and not the process that leads to it.

    After researching for the project, designers will often sketch a lot on paper which can be the most efficient way to brainstorm as many ideas as possible. The goal is to put all your creative ideas on the paper because it is better to have more ideas to chose from than a handful. Sketching is what opens us up to a greater number of possibilities to explore and to develop further. Ultimately, the process results in a great design solution that is aesthetically pleasing and meets the criteria set forth in the creative brief.

    Some projects require the building of physical mock-ups or prototypes. This is true for product designers, packaging designers and print designers. Sometimes, these mock-ups are built to give clients a sense of size or function before moving forward with the design. Other times, physical mock-ups help a designer grasp the dimensions of the object and allows for modifications to be made for a better finish.

    We build mock-ups from paper to help us ensure that the die-cuts for a certain package make sense and will be cut, scored and folded properly. This can also apply to mock-ups for other things we design like folders, direct mail pieces and a variety of other printed media.

    Yes, we do use computers to create our designs, but computers are not the only tool in our arsenal.

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  • What’s Your Color Profile?

    On: June 24, 2015
    In: Design
    Views: 919
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    As a senior graphic designer, choosing the correct color system for my projects comes as second nature. However, when I first started out, things were a bit confusing. Why couldn’t I just create everything in CMYK? What the heck is a PMS color?!

    I found this great infographic that explains EVERYTHING you need to know before choosing the right type of color system for your next project. So whether you’ve been a designer for a while and just need a refresher or you’re just starting out and need some clarification… take a look at the difference between CMYK, RGB and Pantone.

    ColorProfile

    Kristen Oaxaca, Senior Graphic Designer

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  • Images Confusing You?

    On: June 18, 2015
    In: Design
    Views: 1760
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    JPGs, GIFs, PNGs…
    what do they all mean?!

    How do I know when to use which?!

    If you’re frustrated with different file types and knowing which one to use for your different projects, check out the infographic below for some file type trivia and tips that will help you make the right decision!

    FileTypesKristen Oaxaca, Senior Graphic Designer

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  • Graphic Design vs. STDs

    On: April 1, 2015
    In: Design
    Views: 1001
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    I have always found the time during WWII to be an intirguing and inspiring time period—from women who were doing all they could on the home front to the soldiers who fought overseas.

    We’re all familiar with at least one famous poster from that time… I’m sure Rosie the Riveter rings a bell! What many of us have never seen though is the campaign launched by the U.S. Government to do none other than warn U.S. Soldiers of the dangers of “loose women” and STDs.

    Because sex was not often talked about publicly during that time, WWI saw a venereal disease epidemic where soldiers often contracted and died from STDs. In order to prevent that from happening in WWII, the U.S. Government teamed up with designers to create posters that were plastered all over military barracks.

    This campaign to fight STDs used everything from bold colors and striking Hitler images to softer, more emotional images and wording. It’s interesting to see what worked for advertisers back then… take a look compared to what is used in today’s world.

    THEN

    VD-2
    VD-1

    VD-3 VD-4

    NOWVD-5

    VD-6 VD-7

    Kristen Oaxaca, Senior Graphic Designer

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  • See What You Want to See

    On: July 3, 2014
    In: Design
    Views: 845
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    As designers, we’re always looking for different ways to see things… we want to be the one that sees something differently and shows it to the world. In one of their recent ad campaigns for Jeep, Leo Burnett France did just that.

    In this campaign, Leo Burnett France created 3 optical illusions that can be seen when you turn the advertisement over. Now, this wasn’t just a cool optical illusion to include in the advertisement… it actually supported their entire concept.

    On their website, Leo Burnett France said, “When one is the happy owner of a Jeep, we know that at any time we can go where we want to, see what we want to see.” This idea is reinforced in the advertisements because the viewer is welcome to see whatever they want to see… a giraffe or a penguin; an elephant or a swan, etc.

    What do you see?

    Jeep05      Jeep06

    Jeep03      Jeep04

    Jeep01      Jeep02

    Kristen Oaxaca, Graphic Designer

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