• What you should know about posting pictures on Facebook

    On: November 16, 2017
    In: Photography, Social Media
    Views: 15
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    Everyone likes sharing photos on Facebook, but posting photos that you don’t own or includes other people comes with specific responsibilities both ethically and legally.

    Copyright Infringement

    Photos automatically belong to the person who took them. The photographer, not the camera owner owns the picture. If the photo you are using belongs to someone else, you may be committing copyright infringement if you upload it and share it without securing consent.

    Privacy Violations

    Posting photos without permission is a violation of their trust and may lead them to taking legal action against you. Do not post picture of children without their parent’s permission. Facebook has authority to remove photos that contain explicit content, hate speech, personal attacks or depictions of harm, violence or illegal drug use.

    No Technical Restrictions

    There are no restrictions from Facebook to stop you from uploading photos. Facebook does offer people the opportunity to remove objectionable photos after they have been posted by filing a copyright infringement claim or report abusive content.

    Get Permission

    You are not required to secure permission before posting a photo, but it is a good idea to ask permission from the other people appearing in the photo whenever a photo depicts someone in a potentially embarrassing or upsetting way. It is also a good way to ruin a good friendship.

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  • Following the consumer journey 

    On: October 12, 2017
    In: Consumer Journey, Google analytics, Marketing, Online marketing
    Views: 33
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    The consumer journey is the digital path that a consumer takes while online from awareness to purchase.  By understanding the buying habits of your online target audience, determining how they find you online and the steps they take to actually purchasing or making a call to action, businesses can minimize their marketing effort and maximize their revenue.

    Where to start?

    Since consumer journeys are solely based on how they engage with your website, start be breaking down each online interaction to determine where there are drop offs.  People are most likely to enter your website through a search engine.  You want to make sure you have optimized your website with the proper key words that will be used when a consumer is looking for your product or service.  You will want to take advantage of Google Ad words to assist with searches.

    Next, you want to review what pages on your website people are going following their search.  Not every consumer journey starts on the home page.   Make sure all your pages provide an opportunity for further engagement otherwise the consumer will exit your website.

    The final step of the consumer journey is the checkout or call to action.  You need to understand how consumers interact with this page.  A complicated or unsecure site may result in an abandoned shopping cart.  Make sure you have assurances to your consumers against stolen identity, price increase protections, secure site icons, and return policies.

    Google Analytics is great way to study the traffic patterns and behavior on your website to determine what needs to be modified to enhance the consumer journey for your business.

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  • 10 Social Media Content Ideas for your Small Business

    On: September 14, 2017
    In: Social Media
    Views: 65
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    Trying to figure out what content to post to your social media doesn’t have to be time consuming. Take these ten ideas when deciding content:

    1. Video from an event! Social media users love video and they can be 10 to 15 seconds.
    2. Showcase your positive customer reviews and testimonials
    3. Announce an event or award you received
    4. Photos and spotlights on your employees
    5. Photos of employee pets
    6. Inspiration quotes or your company goals
    7. Do you do any charity work? Mention it on social media and be sure to include a picture.
    8. New product announcement or service you offer
    9. Take a vote on something your company does by asking your audience for their feedback
    10. Third party content. Don’t be afraid to use content from the web that relates to your business or service (research/product reviews)
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  • Guide to Email Marketing

    On: August 10, 2017
    In: Email Campaigns, Marketing
    Views: 73
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    It is important to have the right strategy for your email marketing to see a better return on your investment. You shouldn’t be sending emails just to send an email. Send emails that are going to be valuable to your target audience and will strengthen your relationship with them.

    Here are some tips to put into practice:

    • Know you audience and how they prefer to be spoken to (formal, informal)
    • Build your own list through sign ups on your website, blog, contact forms with opt-in info instead of purchasing a list
    • Include a welcome email for all new subscribers to confirm permission
    • Segment your messages towards specific audiences
    • Make sure your copy is clear and concise to meet short attention spans
    • Check image to text ratio to ensure your text version will support HTML emails
    • Offer subscribers something of value (industry tips, coupon, etc.)
    • Make sure you have a call to action so subscribers know what they need to do
    • Do not have a “no reply” email address- you want to encourage 2 way conversations
    • Review metrics for open rates and clicks to determine what worked and what didn’t to adjust accordingly
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  • Myth – My organization doesn’t need at crisis communications plan.

    On: August 3, 2017
    In: Uncategorized
    Views: 76
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    Oh my friend, yes you do. Even if it is a simple list of who gets called first.

    And why? Because anything that enters social media streams about your company, true or not, can be discussed with a potential for escalation. And if there is a real crisis you need to be prepared to speak with the media.

    A few things to consider: Who is the point person that delivers the message? Who is in the key team should a crisis arise? How and when do you reach out to your key stakeholders to keep them updated on the situation?

    Get your crisis plan ready before you ever need one.

     

     

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  • Creative Myth #5 Stock Images – fact and fiction

    On: July 19, 2017
    In: Art, Marketing, Photography, Uncategorized
    Views: 78
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    Myth:  If I pay for a stock image from a stock website, I own the image.

    Well, yes partially.  You have paid for the licensing rights to use an image or in other words you have paid for royalty free copyrights.  However, that image is still available for anyone else to “buy” and use.

    Why this is important…if you are creating a key marketing campaign around a single image or small packet of images and have only invested in the rights for usage, your competitor or someone else in your industry might also love and use them.

    Images are so critical to tell stories, based on shorter attention spans and massive amounts of daily messages.  If your image or images are critical to your “story”, hire a photographer or purchase full rights for the images.

     

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  • Creative Myth #4: Branding and Logos are the Same Thing

    On: July 13, 2017
    In: Branding, Marketing, Uncategorized
    Views: 73
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    These two words are often misused and misunderstood. Branding is about the elevation of a company, product or service from being a commodity to being distinct and recognized through identity, marketing, advertising and most importantly, client experiences. There are many competing products, services and organizations, but branding creates that crucial distinction from the competition.

    Logos by themselves are a graphic icon and/or typographic mark that identifies and represents a product, service or company. Logos are part of brand identity which is the visual part of branding that includes advertisements, signs, uniforms, packaging and many other collateral materials.

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  • Myth #3: Your design should follow the newest trends or match the styles of other designs in your industry

    On: May 10, 2017
    In: Uncategorized
    Views: 66
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    Don’t do it. Resist the temptation to tread a path that’s already been worn by others. Trends come and go (and sometimes come back again), and they change so often and so quickly.

    Matching the look of competing logos is lazy, uninspiring and bad practice. To truly shine, you want to set your brand apart from the competition. That is where an agency like ours can help.

    As graphic designers, we know that there are many competing brands in the marketplace, and it is a challenge to develop something that is creative, fresh and different.

    A solid design should reflect what your brand is about. It can convey your brand’s personality or tone with current and prospective consumers, communicate your brand as being unique rather than a commodity and be easily remembered in the hearts and minds of current and future clients.

    Lastly, the final design can utilize or follow a style or trend ONLY if its use is needed for or is relevant to the communication of your message and not just for personal aesthetic preferences. Again, styles and trends can quickly become dated. You will want your financial investment in the final design to last as long as possible. Don’t pay extra to have your logo, collateral or website redesigned because it is perceived to be dated or does not communicate your brand. It will cost you not only in money but also in brand value in the eyes of the consumer.

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  • Is your social media marketing working? Here’s how to tell.

    On: March 22, 2017
    In: Branding, Google analytics, Social Media
    Views: 68
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    To measure your social media marketing you do it in a similar way in which you analyze all your marketing strategies.

    Measuring your firms reach is one of the most important first steps in this process. Reach is how many people are exposed to your account/advertisement. How many followers your Twitter and Instagram have and how many likes on a Facebook page your firm has are great measurements of how much exposure you social media marketing is receiving.

    Next, you must look at the level of interaction from people who were reached. Social media marketing can be highly interactive, which in turn can increase your reach. You can measure this by the amount of clicks, shares, likes, reposts etc. These are easily measured and can be done by someone fairly inexperienced.

    Most importantly you must look at your conversion rate. Your conversion rate is dependent on your original marketing goal…why are you advertising? Your call to action can be increasing visits to a store front or website, increase sales, or even increase brand awareness. It is all dependent on the firm and what they need to better their business. Google Analytics is a free tool to help you analyze your conversion rate, but there are many others out there too.

    Just like any other type of marketing it is important to realize that this is a great way to advertise, but it’s also extremely easy to lose a lot of money and time. As long as you keep up on your reach, interaction, and conversion you should have no issues creating a cost effective social media campaign.

     

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  • Why do Consumers Purchase?

    On: February 8, 2017
    In: Marketing, Social Media
    Views: 65
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    Consumers purchase different products and services to meet their goals. Their goals can range depending on the day or the hour. For instance one person’s goal can be to nail a job interview or it can be to look “cool” in front of some new friends. These two situations can change what a person is willing to purchase despite their attitude towards a product.

    Someone interviewing for a job may purchase a business suit at the store. Even if they may hate wearing business clothes they will be more likely to purchase them to meet their goal of receiving a job offer. On the other hand someone who wants to look “cool” in front of their friends that night might purchase a trendy new outfit. These competing goals can lead to different purchase decisions regardless of their personal preference.

    There are also many influences over consumers that affect how they will meet their goals. Some of the influencers over consumers include cultural influences and family and friend influences. Cultural influences depend on how someone was raised and where. For instance, in China the color white represents mourning; this cultural norm can cause someone to buy an all-white outfit when a family or friend passes. In the USA this view is the opposite, the social norm is to wear all black to a funeral.

    Family and friends can also change the purchasing behavior of a consumer. Consumer’s two main reference groups include family and friends. Depending on which group someone is trying to fit into will affect the purchase decision. For instance, if you are planning on being around your family you may feel more comfortable buying a pair of sweats to wear, but if you are going to be with friends you know you will be looked down upon for wearing them and will not purchase them.

    Your goals and other social influences can affect your purchasing behavior. It is important as a marketer to realize this and understand that consumers are not necessarily predictable. This is because their attitudes do not always align with goals and others in their reference groups leading to an out of ordinary purchase.

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